Mostly every Wednesday evening from 6-7 the last three Wednesdays of the month. (Aside holiday). One hour will include a lot of BEING. We DO so much in our day to day and this is a chance to BE.   One hour includes Guided + Silent meditation as well a brief dharma talk by Laurie. Two chairs are available for those that cannot sit on Zafu (floor) + 6-10 Meditation cushions available. It is first come first serve. Please call (or text) 508-223-7801 or email to begin reservation process for cushion livingbeingmindful@gmail.com if this is your first class. Classes are focused on mindfulness practice and self-compassion.   Please read the following summary by Chris Germer on the power of Mindfulness and Self-Compassion.   “Mindfulness is the first step—turning with loving awareness toward difficult experience (thoughts, emotions, and sensations). Self-compassion comes next—bringing loving awareness to ourselves. Together, mindfulness and self-compassion comprise a state of warm, connected, presence during difficult moments in our lives.  Most of us feel compassion when a close friend is struggling. What would it be like to receive the same caring attention from yourself when you needed it most? All that’s required is a shift in attention—recognizing that as a human being, you, too, are a worthy recipient of compassion.  Self-compassion involves the capacity to comfort and soothe ourselves, and to motivate ourselves with encouragement, when we suffer, fail, or feel inadequate. Self-compassion is learned in part by connecting with our innate compassion for others, and self-compassion also helps to grow and sustain our compassion for others. Burgeoning research shows that self-compassion is strongly associated with emotional wellbeing, coping with life challenges, lower levels of anxiety and depression, healthy habits such as diet and exercise, and more satisfying personal relationships. It is an inner strength that enables us to be more fully human—to acknowledge our shortcomings, learn from them, and make necessary changes with an attitude of kindness and self-respect.  Fortunately, self-compassion can be learned by anyone.”    Classes are donation based Dana (donation) based.  Dana: Sanskrit, Pali, roughly “gift, alms, donation”; voluntary giving of materials, energy, or wisdom (dharma) to others; generosity; regarded as one of the most important Buddhist virtues.
Mostly every Wednesday evening from 6-7 the last three Wednesdays of the month. (Aside holiday). One hour will include a lot of BEING. We DO so much in our day to day and this is a chance to BE. One hour includes Guided + Silent meditation as well a brief dharma talk by Laurie. Two chairs are available for those that cannot sit on Zafu (floor) + 6-10 Meditation cushions available. It is first come first serve. Please call (or text) 508-223-7801 or email to begin reservation process for cushion livingbeingmindful@gmail.com if this is your first class. Classes are focused on mindfulness practice and self-compassion. Please read the following summary by Chris Germer on the power of Mindfulness and Self-Compassion. “Mindfulness is the first step—turning with loving awareness toward difficult experience (thoughts, emotions, and sensations). Self-compassion comes next—bringing loving awareness to ourselves. Together, mindfulness and self-compassion comprise a state of warm, connected, presence during difficult moments in our lives. Most of us feel compassion when a close friend is struggling. What would it be like to receive the same caring attention from yourself when you needed it most? All that’s required is a shift in attention—recognizing that as a human being, you, too, are a worthy recipient of compassion. Self-compassion involves the capacity to comfort and soothe ourselves, and to motivate ourselves with encouragement, when we suffer, fail, or feel inadequate. Self-compassion is learned in part by connecting with our innate compassion for others, and self-compassion also helps to grow and sustain our compassion for others. Burgeoning research shows that self-compassion is strongly associated with emotional wellbeing, coping with life challenges, lower levels of anxiety and depression, healthy habits such as diet and exercise, and more satisfying personal relationships. It is an inner strength that enables us to be more fully human—to acknowledge our shortcomings, learn from them, and make necessary changes with an attitude of kindness and self-respect. Fortunately, self-compassion can be learned by anyone.” Classes are donation based Dana (donation) based. Dana: Sanskrit, Pali, roughly “gift, alms, donation”; voluntary giving of materials, energy, or wisdom (dharma) to others; generosity; regarded as one of the most important Buddhist virtues.